Latin American Societies Golf Day

Dear All,

I am writing to you again this year to bring the above-captioned event to the attention of all Anglo-Latin American Societies, in the hope that we will have a large turn-out of players, and follow that with an enjoyable lunch. I took over the organisation of the event 4 years ago from David Bouch, who continues to provide assistance to me “from the wings”.

The main trophy, the splendid Ambassadors’ Cup, was presented by the Ambassadors of Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Mexico in 1950, and has been competed for every year since then, making this, 2015, the 66th year. Last year’s winner, representing LAGS and the Anglo Argentine Society, was John Shearer. We will also be competing for The Rose Bowl, which will go to the highest scoring member of the Anglo Argentine Society, the Jangara ditto the Anglo Brazilian Society, The Chile Cup, ditto the Anglo Chilean Society, the Callum Sharkey Trophy for the highest placed Lady, and finally the “LOS DEMAS”, presented by Lan Chile, for the highest points scorer not having won one of the previously mentioned Cups. There will also be a prize for the Best Guest and several Nearest-the-Pin and Longest Drive prizes.

West Surrey Golf Club, at Enton, near Godalming, Surrey, has hosted the event for the last several years, and always puts on a very warm welcome to all players, following up the golf with a traditional and hearty lunch. The par-71 course, which celebrated its centenary in 2010, is in a beautiful parkland setting and maintained to a very high standard. The course has been reserved for us from 8.45 until 10am, and the competition will be over 18 holes (Stableford Scoring), playing in flights of three. Entry is open to all members (with recognised handicaps) of the various Anglo Latin American Societies, who may also bring guests.

The cost for the day will be £67.00 for coffee (from 8am), golf and a carvery lunch. This cost is the same as it was last year, and, considering the quality of the course, represents very good value. The fee for a WSGC member will be £35, and for those having lunch only will be £25.

I attach an entry form for completion by all interested players, plus those intending to attend only the lunch, and would be most grateful if you could please bring this important, long-standing and most enjoyable event to the attention of all your members. If anyone has any questions, please revert to me by email or by telephone on 01483-892382.

With very best wishes,

Yours sincerely

Alan WilkinsondownloadLAGS Appln Form 2015

Fundación Grupo San Felipe News

An update from Fundacion Grupo San Felipe:

Scholarships:

First, I thought it interesting to share a little statistics with you in order to celebrate our achievements. The AAS helped us during the last years and therefore you can feel proud of being part of our accomplishments!!

 Until now, we had granted 31 scholarships! As you know, some scholarships are given to students from Añatuya (Province of Santiago del Estero) and others to students from Retiro (Villa 31, City of Buenos Aires).

 From those 31 students: 9 finished their studies and got their diplomas (6 from Añatuya and 3 from Retiro); 15 are still attending classes and/or finishing their exams (8 from Añatuya and 7 from Retiro); and 7 could not complete their studies.

 One of the students who finished her studies last August is Soledad Mojica (one of the AAS donations was destined to cover her scholarship!!). She obtained the title of “Técnico Superior Contable Impositivo” (“Senior Technician in Accountancy and Taxation”) from the Catholic Institute of Superior Studies which belongs to the Catholic University of Santiago del Estero.

We also have 15 tutors who are in charge of following up and assisting each of the current scholars. From these 15 tutors, 14 are volunteers from Buenos Aires and 1 of them is an ex-scholar from Añatuya who wanted to give something back to Grupo San Felipe and his community. And this is one of the most important and encouraging things can happen!

Activities:

 We keep on doing our 5 visits to Añatuya (we stay there from Saturday morning until Sunday night). We do this through groups formed by 10 volunteers and, of course, we try to rotate these groups so as to let as many of the 60 volunteers that form Grupo San Felipe participate at least once a year. Some 80 students attend each of this weekend visits.

 We also celebrated the “Añatuya Sabe 2012” competition. This is the competition in which approximately a 100 students from different schools form groups of 5 to compete in a “jeopardy style” knowledge competition were we asked them about different subjects (i.e. mathematics, history, geography, physics, literature, etc.) and the winner is awarded a trip to the Cordoba Space Centre! (we attached a picture with the volunteers that attended the 2012 competition).

 Next November we will have the “Mi Barrio Sabe 2012” which is the same competition as “Añatuya Sabe” but in Retiro.

 We are working on setting up a commission that will be in charge of “Careers and Employability”.

 Last but not the least, we also had a “cultural weekend” with scholars from Añatuya and Retiro who joined us for a visit to a Museum, Plaza de Mayo, the Buenos Aires Cathedral, the “Casa Rosada”, the Planetarium (we attached a picture of it), Colon Theatre and a fantastic dinner with many volunteers of the Fundacion Grupo San Felipe.

Our Man In Buenos Aires – Asados

OUR MAN IN BUENOS AIRES

 

Archie Whitworth

“Asados”

One doesn’t need to spend too much time in Argentina before the cultural importance of the asado becomes clear. The ritual of grilling entire animals to be shared between family and friends represents something so much more than a meal: being perhaps the one thing that all Argentines have in common, it unites them in a way that other cultural icons divide. People may argue about Evita or tussle over tango, but asado means asado to everyone.
Of course, each asador has his own methods, his preferred cuts, his individual approach and eccentricities. Nonetheless, it is often a surprise to a visitor that when Argentines say ‘barbecue’ they are not referring to burgers and bangers, but the entire cow. This wasn’t always the case. Travellers in Argentina during the 19th century reported the horror of seeing cow carcasses left in fields, having been stripped of their hides and a small amount of meat for individual consumption by their owners. Perhaps it is this memory that led Argentines to devise a way of cooking absolutely everything on each animal, as perhaps a tribute or apology to years of wastefulness.
Asados are such an integral part of Argentine culture, and represent such a source of pride, that it often bemuses the locals when foreigners have a go. I have witnessed several such asados, where the foreigner huffs and puffs, while the Argentines stand back, arms crossed, watching, always eager to step in should disaster threaten. Effort is always appreciated, but sometimes it is best to let the experts do their thing…
– Archie Whitworth